New Wonder of the Science World – Martian Light Satirical Comedy

After the Greenygrey was the last new scientific wonder of the world when it emerged into the human world in 2008 it seems planet Earth is already ready for the next one. That’s according to Ben Gilliland in Metro’s Microcosm anyway, although he doesn’t mention the Greenygrey part.

Moreover, in a hot off the press Greenygrey double bill, there’s also today’s amazing image of a light on the Mars surface, which life on Mars believers claim is evidence of something living under the surface.

Square Kilometer Array (SKA) 

The Very Large Array at Socorro, New Mexico, U...

The Very Large Array at Socorro, New Mexico, United States. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, satirical comedy science correspondent at the Greenygrey inspired by legendary astrophysicist Stephen Hawking.

Gilliland was talking about the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which ‘will be the ultimate in Universe-probing radio telescopes. Made up of hundreds of thousands of individual radio telescopes and built across South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, the SKA will have the resolving power equivalent to telescope with lens measuring one square kilometre. ‘

Seeing to Beginning of Time

Moreover, after I reported greenygrey present in the universe soon after the Big Bang last month, SKA will be able to see back to the time before the universe we can see at the moment was created; when there were just gases and no solid forms.

Green Alien

Green Alien (Photo credit: Fried Dough)

That means we might finally get to the bottom of the Greenygreylien mystery. Metro has a great Greenygreylien image in its infographic online, which was part of the bigger picture, so was too massive to import into the Greenygrey world.

But never fear, there are loads of great greenygreylien images online, thanks to Martians being perceived as green.

Light on Mars Image

Talking of Martians, but not greenygrey coloured, although in line with Greenygrey theory, an exciting new photo today showed a spark of light on Mars; reported in Metro today by Jimmy Nsubuga.

It was taken by the NASA Curiosity Rover, which is like a futuristic Greenygrey robotydog.

Believers in life on Mars, who could be seen as the Green theorists, claim it is evidence of Martians living underground; while sceptics, who could be called the Grey theorists, say it is a cosmic flare hitting the Martian surface:

Does this mystery white light suggest there's life on Mars?

Metro

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ancient Star Found, DNA Research Off Ground

As regular readers will know, the Greenygrey awoke on the north-west of North America coast in 2008, not knowing its origins. It thought it’d been around for quite a while, but a new discovery suggests it could have been around since the beginning of the universe.

Earliest Star Universe Image

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, satirical comedy science correspondent at the Greenygrey inspired by renowned astronomer Stephen Hawking.

Yes, there’s an exciting new discovery for greenygreyologists searching for the origins of the greenygrey.

The sparkonit blog reports that astronomers think they’ve found the earliest star after the Big Bang yet: ‘The star, designated SMSS J031300.36−670839.3, is believed to have formed some hundred million years after the Big-Bang.’

Moreover, the accompanying image suggests the building blocks of the Greenygrey were already active then:

Oldest Star Discovered, Could Bring An End To The Big-Bang Discrepancy

DNA Gene Research

In another exciting development for Greenygreyology sparkonit reports that  ‘research at the University of California – Davis has proved that the new genes come from the non-coding regions of the DNA.’

Up until now, geneticists had been unaware of the mechanism by which new genes appear in a species.

This could lead to the Greenygrey
finally learning its complete DNA:

Research Reveals The Formation Of New Genes From Non-Coding DNA

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Observable Universe may be One Amazing Space among Many

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, science expert at the Greenygrey. It’s hard to imagine, but the night-sky you see only contains a miniscule amount of what is actually in space around us. This was emphasised by a photo in an article on the Matador Network.

Amount of Galaxies in Space is Astounding

The article about telescopes by Hal Amen featured an image by the Hubble telescope showing an area in space a tenth the diameter of the full moon as we see it from Earth. They found 10,000 galaxies in the image. If that random part of space is typical, then there are 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe.

Our Milky Way galaxy is one amongst billions, as our sun is one star amongst billions and our planet one amongst billions; with many exo-planets and moons thought to be ideal for harbouring life. This image shows our sun’s position in our galaxy:


Image from the Atlas of the Universe website.

Beyond the Observable Universe

Although our brains and technology have obviously not seen what is beyond the observable universe, scientists have some theories. Martin Rees believes that we may be one universe among many. He proposed this in an article on the Prospect website, which began and ended with these paragraphs:

An astonishing concept has entered mainstream cosmological thought: physical reality could be hugely more extensive than the patch of space and time traditionally called “the universe.” We’ve learnt that we live in a solar system that is just one planetary system among billions, in one galaxy among billions. But there are signs that a further Copernican demotion confronts us. The entire panorama that astronomers can observe could be a tiny part of the aftermath of our Big Bang, which is itself just one bang among a potentially infinite ensemble. In this grander perspective, what we’ve traditionally called the laws of nature may be no more than parochial bylaws—local manifestations of “bedrock” laws that must be sought at a still deeper level.

Our cosmic environment could be richly textured, but on scales so vast that our purview is restricted to a tiny fragment. We’re not directly aware of the big picture, any more than a plankton whose universe is a litre of water would be aware of the world’s topography and biosphere. It is sensible for cosmologists to start off by exploring the simplest models. But there is no more reason to expect simplicity on the grandest scale than in the terrestrial environment, where intricate complexity prevails. It is exhilarating that this wonderful concept is now within the scope of scientific enquiry.

Enhanced by Zemanta